berdww's Blog

Feb. 14, 2010 at 5:22am

Rally Against ICE Northwest Detention Center

No Mas Deportaciones! Justicia Ya!

Saturday, February 13, 2010

Tacoma, WA - People came from near and far (Tacoma, Seattle, Olympia, and Portland) for a rally against the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington. The detention center is run for-profit, by The GEO Group Inc. According to the description on company's website:

GEO(NYSE: GGI) is an industry leader and pioneer in the privatization of correctional facilities throughout the world and is the largest publicly traded company engaged solely in the business of managing correctional and detention facilities. The company offers a comprehensive range of prison and correctional related services to federal, state, local and overseas government agencies.

Meanwhile, many people have complained about abuse in the prison, where many individuals, (the facility has capacity for over 1,000,) whom have not even been accused of committing any crimes, have been inhumanely detained for months, and in some cases for years, at a time (ref: http://www.hatefreezone.org/downloads/ExecutiveSummary.pdf .)

There is more to this story: much, much more. One participant in today's rally called the ICE facility "Guantanamo Northwest". Perhaps that was an exaggeration - but what the conditions are really like inside the prison are not well known by most people.

Another participant informed the assembled rallyers that prisoners in the facility are given pills to keep them calm.

Again, there is much, much more to this story. And certainly it is important to connect the issue of immigration and violations of human rights, with abusive international policies of socio-economic and political dominance and exploitation.

No One is Illegal, Bridges NOT Walls

- Berd


more photos:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwhitlock/sets/72157623306273119/

comments [39]  |  posted under department of homeland security, immigration customs enforcement, justice, law, port of tacoma, protest, racism

Comments

by fredo on 2/14/2010 @ 7:21am
I don't have any problem with the facility. If it were twice as big it would provide even more jobs for the fine people of Tacoma.

People who don't wish to run afoul of US immigration law and occasion a stay in the facility have an option. Don't enter or remain in the US without proper documentation. This isn't rocket science.

by dolly varden on 2/14/2010 @ 9:48am
I would extend Fredo's arguments to anyone who is accused of doing anything illegal. Just lock 'em up. We waste soooo much of our hard-earned money on providing the "due process" "required" by the Constitution. Who needs it? Just keep to the straight and narrow, and history shows that you can rely on the police and prosecutors to treat you well without respect to race or creed.

by fredo on 2/14/2010 @ 9:53am
Our government treats illegal aliens without "due process". Thanks dolly, that's another reason illegals should stay in their own country.

by NineInchNachos on 2/14/2010 @ 9:55am
these crooks are right up there with blackwater. stick it to em!

by dolly varden on 2/14/2010 @ 9:56am
I agree Fredo. Regular prisoners are sub-human, but these "folks," which I like to call them to disguise my contempt, are sub-sub-human.

by fredo on 2/14/2010 @ 10:24am
Consequences of life choices which are unpleasant, unfair, and unintentional are not necessarily unforeseeable or unavoidable. People who enter our country with the correct paperwork don't seem to have any problems. The people living at ICE aren't sub-sub-human. They're just garden variety scofflaws who, if released on their own recognizance wouldn't show up for court dates.

by Mofo from the Hood on 2/14/2010 @ 10:58am
"have not even been accused of committing any crimes, have been inhumanely detained for months, and in some cases for years, at a time (1)."

Sounds like a typical someone projecting their family and Tacoma Public School experience when they were a teenager.

by fredo on 2/14/2010 @ 11:17am
If the WTC bombers would have been housed in an ICE detention facility back in 2001 almost 3000 Americans would be alive today.

by panachronic on 2/14/2010 @ 11:54am
I would extend Fredo's arguments to anyone who is accused of doing anything illegal. Just lock 'em up. We waste soooo much of our hard-earned money on providing the "due process" "required" by the Constitution.

I have just two words in response: Maurice Clemmons.

by Mofo from the Hood on 2/14/2010 @ 11:57am
I guess what really ticks some people off about U.S. policy toward immigrants---whether illegal Mexican nationals crossing the Arizona state line, or terrorist camp graduates from Pakistan trying to catch a commercial jet to the U.S.---the really abusive thing is racial profiling.

Thanks protestors of ICE. You just keep on looking out for the citizens of the U.S..


by NineInchNachos on 2/14/2010 @ 1:07pm
a privatized detention center creates a corporate incentive for the need of people here illegally just like the prison guard unions in California create an incentive for 3-strikes-your-out laws.

by dolly varden on 2/14/2010 @ 1:24pm
Exactamundo, Panachronic. The fact that a dangerous nut like Maurice Clemmons existed, was released prematurely, and did a truly horrible thing means we should "change it back" to pre-Constitutional days, or maybe pre-Magna Carta days and go all medieval on those criminals' behinds. Or we could go the Dick Cheney route and keep the laws on the books but do whatever we like behind closed doors. What does it really matter? Any of the above will make me feel better about my personal safety and my red-blooded patriotism.

I'll miss the baby, but getting rid of that old bathwater will be worth it.

by panachronic on 2/14/2010 @ 2:27pm
Do I understand you correctly, DV? Are you saying that criminals should be released without being incarcerated? Because even if we cut through your absurd rhetorical hyperbole, that seems to be what you are saying.

People protesting against this federal jail (let's call it what it is) are conveniently forgetting one thing: pretty much everybody in there has broken the law. We can debate the merits of privatized institutions if you want to, but it's important not to lose sight of that one salient fact. It's really, really easy to avoid being looked up in the ICE facility... just don't be an illegal alien.

by dolly varden on 2/14/2010 @ 2:39pm
I'm saying, PC, that arraignment and trial are risks we can no longer take with illegal immigrants -- they're FAR too DANGEROUS.

That's why I like ICE -- they don't worry about the procedural stuff like soft-headed liberals do. And Obama's kept it around. Nothing to change back!

But even the friendly, non-sarcastic version of DV thinks it's OK to incarcerate the accused (they're called the "accused" because they're supposed to accused of something) in advance of being charged and tried -- as long as their right to a speedy trial is granted.

by Altered Chords on 2/14/2010 @ 3:11pm
I just hope all of the smart educated people from India don't start wandering into the U.S. and take all the high paying jobs leaving us poor now native americans to pick fruit and live in carboard boxes.

by Mofo from the Hood on 2/14/2010 @ 3:52pm
"right to a speedy trial is granted."

How or why should it be that an illegal immigrant or an enemy of the state is eligible for U.S. citizen rights?

The thought of assimilating anti-U.S. barbarians---scheming, divisive enemies of the state---into the republic with instant citizen rights in the name of humanitarian principles makes no sense. It's nonsense.

It does however pose a good argument for legitimate U.S. citizens to bear arms and use them if necessary to uphold their pledge of allegiance to secure justice for all the law abiding legitimate citizens of this so-called indivisible republic.

by NineInchNachos on 2/14/2010 @ 4:17pm
what happens when american citizens get swept up into ICE by accident? Who cares right? better safe than sorry.

by dolly varden on 2/14/2010 @ 4:21pm
That's right, Mofo. Most immigrants are huge national security threats -- their economic desperation is a total ruse. After all, if they were just regular people looking for under the table jobs, it's totally fair to round them up and leave them in jail indefinitely without being charged for nuthin'. It's totally in line with the Declaration of Independence dictum that "all men are created equal." Fairness and humane start and end at our border and should not extend to those not blessed to be U.S. citizens. After all, if I'm traveling outside the U.S. and lost my passport or got confused with somebody who was actually dangerous, I'd deserve whatever I got, even indefinite detention or worse.

by Mofo from the Hood on 2/14/2010 @ 6:24pm
There's plenty of documented evidence of wrongly incarcerated individuals. The imperfection of man and his systems have caused untold grief. Likewise the extremes of wrongful judgements demonstrate the need for checks and balances and explains why many people are also against the death penalty.

But it's usually the case that people who are incarcerated have abused some sort of freedom.

Mexican nationals who want to enter the U.S. are free to do so under certain rules. Under no circumstance are the citizens of the U.S. obliged to allow entry and special rights to enemies of the state----people who show contempt for the laws of the U.S. and its citizens.

Also dv, your quote, "all men are created equal," assumes a creator. Whenever one is uncertain if their behavior is right or wrong, one can ask themselves this question: "Would this please God?" What is and what is not pleasing to God is revealed in the Bible. In fact I highly recommend the Bible to all the protestors of ICE because the main character, Jesus, is a pacifist.

Plenty of pacifists have been jailed too, usually for protesting against man's laws in favor of the divine authority of the God of the Bible. Don't underestimate the necessity of a divine imperative. If you eradicate God as the sovereign transcendent authority, there is no other option for men than structuring order and unity by force.

Just the same, when enemies of the state scheme and attack our culture for whatever reason, the only way to overcome that kind of force is by responding with swift and overwhelming force.


by ixora on 2/14/2010 @ 7:34pm
The Tacoma Solution...
search.tacomapubliclibrary.org/postcard/...

by dolly varden on 2/14/2010 @ 8:13pm
Nice postcard.

Mofo, I don't think any religion that discourages working to perfect society, knowing all the while that all you can do is progress rather than perfect. Rather, I see the teachings of major religious figures and other great people as kind of pointless if you don't try and implement their teachings in your personal life and your life as a citizen.

Not to get all, syrupy here, but isn't the desire to do our little part to form a more perfect (any similarity here to the preamble of the Constitution is strictly coincidental) society one reason why we have these conversations? Or is it just for entertainment and to get in each others' face?

by Mofo from the Hood on 2/14/2010 @ 9:16pm
"I see the teachings of major religious figures and other great people as kind of pointless if you don't try and implement their teachings in your personal life and your life as a citizen."---dv

dv, here's a reality based example that's my best attempt at addressing your comment.

Different religions have different doctrines of God. Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, or any other religion each has their own unique non-negotiable doctrines.

The U.S. has been categorized as a Christian nation because the population has been estimated at over 90% aligned with some form of the faith. Since Christianity's start in the 1st century all missionary efforts have been based on peaceful teachings. Likewise since the 1st century, Christians have been persecuted with the intent of wiping out its existence.

In contrast, Islam has a different doctrine of God. Islam has a different method of gaining converts. That method has historically been a warlord based effort that invaded nations and demanded conversion to the faith or die. Islam is anti-Christianity.

If an Islamic terrorist attacks the U.S. and is placed in an ICE detention center and U.S. citizen protestors rally for humanitarian rights in the name of socialist ideals, that action is nothing less than heretical and traitorous.






by ixora on 2/14/2010 @ 10:21pm
"Since Christianity's start in the 1st century all missionary efforts have been based on peaceful teachings." Wow. Someone needs to read some history.

by Mofo from the Hood on 2/14/2010 @ 10:44pm
ixora, where in the Bible does it say that Christian missionary efforts are to employ any tactics or strategies beyond peaceful teaching.

by fredo on 2/15/2010 @ 8:39am
The ICE detention center is an example of the government's constitutional requirement to "...insure domestic tranquility...and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves"

In all fairness Dolly, I don't think too many people housed at the ICE came here as visitors and lost their passports.


by berdww on 2/15/2010 @ 9:26am
I think that the ICE Detention Center is a symptom of the deeply diseased nature of our society.

When some people are willing to put others down for the purpose of economic self-interest - when people are willing to exploit each other - there is a fundamental violence that exists at the roots, and in the heart, of our socio-economic political system.

The Detention Center is an outward manifestation of a culture of cruelness, meanness, hurtfulness, exclusion, fear, and exploitation (etc.) that exists in the roots and heart of this society.

by Nick on 2/15/2010 @ 9:50am
It seems to me both sides of this argument are arguing about different things (correct me if I'm wrong on that). One side is arguing in favor of the principles behind preventing illegal immigration, and the other is arguing against how it is currently being executed.

I find myself sitting somewhere in the middle. I find it hard to argue against someone receiving the consequences of their actions (for many, they took a calculated risk, knowing the possibilities). At the same time, many of the rights I enjoy as a US citizen I believe to be universal human rights, not reserved for those who reside within some arbitrary borders.

Perhaps a balance just needs to be found between stabilizing our borders and finding a reasonable process for this whole thing. Surely we could find consequences that are more proportionate to the crime?

by fredo on 2/15/2010 @ 9:50am
I'm not "putting others down" or "exploiting" anybody.

The detention center didn't cause these people problems, nor did our culture of "violence, cruelness, meanness, hurtfulness, fear or exploitation."

These problems occurred because people failed to exercise reasonable decision making in their personal lives. People living in third world countries who don't like our immigration laws have the option of staying where they are and working to make their own countries better.

by Altered Chords on 2/15/2010 @ 9:54am
Who wants to move to Denmark with me?

by fredo on 2/15/2010 @ 10:02am
"Surely we could find consequences that are more proportionate to the crime." Nick

Such as?

Since the US is such a wicked place, maybe someone could inform us of a developed country that has an open border arrangement which allows people to pour in from third world countries without control and without recourse. We need to be enlightened.

by Altered Chords on 2/15/2010 @ 10:41am
Forget Denmark. Lets move to Luxembourg. Highest per capita income, happiest people, highest alcohol consumption per capita. I'll bet you can just walk in there and make it your home. If we show up and rob a liquor store (to keep up w/ alcohol consumption) I'll be they'll be nice to us and not throw us in a detention center.

by Mofo from the Hood on 2/15/2010 @ 11:09am
"there is a fundamental violence that exists at the roots, and in the heart, of our socio-economic political system."---berdww@9:26am

Agreed. Man is fundamentally corrupt. He abuses his freedom to choose between right and wrong actions. (Assuming you believe we live in a moral universe.)

Sometimes abusers of freedom are removed from society---put in prison---and then by choice or institutional structure, the prisoner works to develop his mind and character.

In any case, the point of education is to teach the correct use of freedom.

Of course the idea that man has freedom of choice opposes the idea that man's actions are determined by nature and that he does not have the capacity to change---Once a thief, always a thief. But that kind of thinking leads to theories of race and the dismissal of personal responsibility---Topics that sociologists and psychologists use to develop libraries of narratives to support expansive commercial industries like pharmaceuticals and other control mechanisms.




by ixora on 2/15/2010 @ 11:25am
Mofo, First off, all Christian missionary efforts since the first century have NOT been solely based on the bible. "The Bible" didn't even exist in the first century, anyway. But to avoid turning this into an essay on the history of textual criticism and the biblical canon, let's move on. Even if they had been based on the bible, the number of "Christian" ideologies have been legion due to the varieties of declarations in the bible, some rather bizarre, some completely unintelligible. Throughout history Christians have used passages in the bible to justify their missionary zeal to make everyone think and behave like themselves. Sometimes that zeal is driven by anger or fear, and when that has been the case, watch out… we have God on our side. And there are plenty of passages in the bible that vindicate the terrible swift sword… (In the OT: suffer not a witch to live...go, take the city and kill every man, woman and child… etc. etc. NT: "I come not to bring peace, but to bring a sword" … “But those enemies of mine who did not want me to be king over them--bring them here and kill them in front of me. After Jesus had said this, he went on ahead...” etc. etc.) Let’s face it… when it comes to the word of god, the sword of the lord, it tends to say whatever the believer wants. And if the believer is angry, watch out.

by Nick on 2/15/2010 @ 12:40pm
@fredo

I wouldn't say the US is a wicked place, just that there is an imbalance between the severity of the consequence and the crime in this case. In fact, the US is quite the opposite, which is why we have an immigration problem to begin with. Many people want in.

To answer your "such as" question, I'd recommend we model our immigration system after our domestic justice system and guarantee due process for all human beings, not just US citizens.

by fredo on 2/15/2010 @ 12:55pm
@Nick

What due process are the 'human beings' being held at the ICE being deprived of? Please be specific.

I'm still waiting for someone to inform us of the name of a developed country with an enlightened immigration policy that allows people from third world countries to enter the country and proceed as if they belonged there.

by Nick on 2/15/2010 @ 1:50pm
"What due process are the 'human beings' being held at the ICE being deprived of? Please be specific."

Nothing I said had anything to do with ICE, nor did it categorically group together all those 'human beings' currently being held there.

I am simply suggesting that our immigration system be subject to the same standards as our judicial system. Guarantee a fair trial/hearing, require the process be done in a timely manner, etc.

"I'm still waiting for someone to inform us of the name of a developed country with an enlightened immigration policy that allows people from third world countries to enter the country and proceed as if they belonged there."

I don't understand how this is relevant. I haven't heard this suggested as an approach the US should be taking.

by panachronic on 2/15/2010 @ 3:22pm
LOLing @ berdww...

When some people are willing to put others down for the purpose of economic self-interest - when people are willing to exploit each other - there is a fundamental violence that exists at the roots, and in the heart, of our socio-economic political system.

Hey, I didn't know we were discussing the state Legislature!

by Mofo from the Hood on 2/16/2010 @ 6:16pm
ixora, check out the primary source for Christian doctrine, the New Testament letters of St. Paul. They were all written in the 1st century and they were circulated then amongst the churches.

People have been trying to revise his writings since they first appeared. You can read his warnings about that in his letters.

Lastly, the Church was founded by a Jewish rabbi, Jesus of Nazareth in the 1st century and He personally hand-picked and instructed 12 Apostles from which He also appointed the first Pope, Peter. The Roman Catholic Church traces its line of authority back to those founding moments.

by berdww on 2/20/2010 @ 4:36pm
More information about the Geo Group:

www.google.com/finance?client=ob&q=NYSE:...